Despite highest impact player, New Zealand receives a pasting

New Zealand vs South Africa ODI Series Review

By Jaideep Varma and Jatin Thakkar

After a hard-fought T20 series, which ended in a shocking choke by the Kiwis from a winning position in the decider, the ODI series promised an interesting set of matches. The first match began well for New Zealand, as they scored 253 and had South Africa teetering at 35 for 3. But some individual brilliance from AB de Villiers’ got them out of that hole however, and this time that appeared to be the defining blow. For the rest of the series, for the most part, South Africa called the shots quite comprehensively.
 
Here is an overview of the series through the Impact Index lens.



Observations:

New Zealand captain and wicketkeeper Brendon McCullum was interestingly the highest-impact player in the series. His Batting IMPACT of 3.32 in the series (for his 56, 85 and 47) was second only to Amla’s. McCullum absorbed considerable pressure in all the 3 matches as a batsman (which also gave him the highest Pressure IMPACT amongst all New Zealand batsmen). He had an IMPACT of 0.92 as a wicketkeeper…all of which eventually made him the only player to cross an IMPACT of 4 in the series.

To complement McCullum’s excellence as a wicketkeeper-batsman, South African wicketkeeper AB de Villiers was the highest impact player for his team. Almost single-handedly, he won the first ODI for South Africa with the bat (106 off 106, IMPACT 8.06 – the highest impact batting performance in the series), and then produced neat finishing touches in the next two (unbeaten innings of 31 and 9). He had the highest Chasing/ Finishing IMPACT in the series as well as Pressure IMPACT (along with JP Duminy). His wicketkeeping IMPACT was a high 1.26 – and he was eventually also the only player in the series who had an all-round impact (an IMPACT of over 1 in any two functions). It eventually helped him register an IMPACT of 3.72 overall.  

Morne Morkel achieved this identical impact of 3.72 just with the ball, which is what his 7 wickets at 12 at an economy of 4.7 translated to, in just two matches. It made him the highest impact bowler in the series, and the third-highest impact player of the series. The South African bowling had Tsotsobe (2.91), Kallis (1.83), Steyn (1.31) and Peterson (1.22) crossing an IMPACT of 1 for the series. Moreover, Morkel, Tsotsobe and Kallis had a 0% failure rate while bowling in all three matches.

Conversely, only two New Zealand bowlers managed to cross Bowling IMPACT of 1 in the series – KD Mills (1.22) and RJ Nicol (1.08) – a very telling picture for the series. Not a single Kiwi managed a 0% failure rate as a bowler (except Michael Bates, but he played only one match).

Hashim Amla’s performances in the second game (92 off 117, IMPACT 5.97) and third game (76 off 89, IMPACT 5) while chasing, made him the highest impact batsman in the series from both sides (and the fourth-highest impact player of the series). He failed only once in his three matches and overall, registered an impact in all batting parameters – Strike Rate IMPACT, Pressure IMPACT, Partnership-building IMPACT and Chasing IMPACT. It was a complete batting performance by him in the series.

Jacques Kallis registered the highest Partnership Breaking IMPACT in the series. His efforts in the first match (dismissing McCullum at 137-3) and the second (Guptill at 131-2) were breakthroughs at crucial junctures, which had a noticeable impact in South Africa’s fortunes in the series.

Marchant de Lange (4 for 46 in 9 overs, Bowling IMPACT 4.71) for South Africa and Colin de Grandhomme (36 off 36, IMPACT 2.73) for New Zealand made impressive debuts in the third match.

Eventually, amongst the top ten impact players of the series (minimum two matches), only two were New Zealanders. This dominance is reflected amply in the Team IMPACT numbers for the series too – 2.45 for South Africa. 1.50 for New Zealand. It was an unqualified thrashing.

For more information, please go to www.impactindexcricket.com

Recent Articles by Impact Index

Pagination

(99 stories)

Matches

SPECIALS

  • Five memorable moments from the India-West Indies match that don’t fade away
    The West Indies are evoking their legendary teams of the 1980s

    As part of a generation of cricket fans too young to remember Viv Richards or Clive Lloyd, we relied on mythology to learn about those inimitable West Indies teams of the 1970s and ‘80s who ruthlessly crushed opponents to the tune of their magnetic rhythm. Perhaps no team has ever transcended the sport quite like those inimitable West Indies, comprised of a collection of effervescent players that even captured the hearts of opposition fans. Legendary pacemen Curtly Ambrose and Courtney Walsh were in their primes, and a young Brian Lara beguiled with the bat but it was obvious the West Indies were on the slide. More »The West Indies are evoking their legendary teams of the 1980s

    Five memorable moments from the India-West Indies match that don’t fade away

    As part of a generation of cricket fans too young to remember Viv Richards or Clive Lloyd, we relied on mythology to learn about those inimitable West Indies teams of the 1970s and ‘80s who ruthlessly crushed opponents to the tune of their magnetic rhythm. Perhaps no team has ever transcended the sport quite like those …

  • Smith sad to see Watson miss out on fairytale finish
    Unfairly mocked and maligned, Shane Watson will be missed from international cricket

    Loved by the Indian public for his IPL performances, the 34-year-old does not evoke similar sentiments from his compatriots. More »Unfairly mocked and maligned, Shane Watson will be missed from international cricket

    Smith sad to see Watson miss out on fairytale finish

    Loved by the Indian public for his IPL performances, the 34-year-old does not evoke similar sentiments from his compatriots.

  • Cricket - South Africa v England - World Twenty20 cricket tournament
    Classy Root flourishes into master of all formats By Amlan Chakraborty

    By Amlan Chakraborty NEW DELHI (Reuters) - There was never an iota of doubt over Joe Root's class since his 2012 test debut against India but the 25-year-old Yorkshireman's latest heroics have left many wondering if he is England's best ever batsman across the three formats of the game. Root is among the rare breed of Twenty20 batsmen who need not sacrifice aesthetics to score freely, a virtue he displayed with a magnificent 83 in England's campaign-reviving victory against South Africa in Friday's World Twenty20 match in Mumbai. "He is the best England batsman across all forms of cricket... ever," former England captain Nasser Hussain told Sky Sports after the team chased down an imposing target of 230 to record a two-wicket win. More »Classy Root flourishes into master of all formats

    Cricket - South Africa v England - World Twenty20 cricket tournament

    By Amlan Chakraborty NEW DELHI (Reuters) - There was never an iota of doubt over Joe Root's class since his 2012 test debut against India but the 25-year-old Yorkshireman's latest heroics have left many wondering if he is England's best ever batsman across the three formats of the game. Root is among the rare breed of …

 

Regulars