Anantha Narayanan

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  • ODI outlier bowler performances

    Last year, I had done an analysis of outperforming innings in
    ODI matches
    . This table was dominated by Shahid Afridi. It is very fair that I
    do the same for the forgotten species, the bowlers. The ideas are similar. I
    determine the RpO values of the bowler and team and determine the ratio between
    these two values. This has turned out to be an interesting analysis and led to surprising
    conclusions.

     

    First, let me clarify that this cannot be
    done based on wickets captured. There are only 10 wickets available and anyone
    who has captured 5 or more wickets has outperformed his teammates. Vaas, with 8
    wickets, would have outperformed his fellow bowlers by a factor of 4. It would
    be silly for me to analyze this.

     

    So I would do this analysis based on the
    RpO (Runs per Over) values which show wide variations and there is no limit to
    the numbers, either way.

     

    I have selected 4 overs as the minimum for
    inclusion. This is based on the fact that a typical opening spell could be 4
    overs long

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  • T20 all-rounders: a comprehensive analysis

    Twenty20 is a format eminently suitable for the bits-and-pieces
    player, the one who does something in every department of the game, not
    always at the top-drawer level. However, T20 also calls for top-quality
    all-rounders who perform with the bat and ball very effectively. This
    article looks at such players.

    The qualification criteria
    are 200 runs and 10 wickets. Unfortunately, the bar has to be kept
    somewhat low since very few matches have been played in the format.

    The
    first table looks at the overall quantitative achievements. I have just
    added the runs scored and wickets captured multiplied by 25 to derive
    an overall achievement table in terms of Equivalent Runs. This may be
    longevity based but should not detract from the achievements of the
    players.

     

     

    Batsman

    Team

    Matches

    Runs

    Wkts

    WktRuns

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Shahid
    Afridi

    Pak

    43

    683

    53

    2008

    Jayasuriya
    S.T

    Slk

    31

    629

    19

    1104

    Hussey
    D.J

    Aus

    31

    667

    17

    1092

    Styris
    S.B

    Read More »from T20 all-rounders: a comprehensive analysis
  • Champions’ League 2011 – an irreverent look

     

     

     

    The innings of the tournament: Warner's 135 in 69 balls for New South Wales against Chennai. Analytically, this has become the best IPL/CL innings ever played. However, visually also there has been no better innings ever. It was important that the NSW bowlers delivered the match for Warner. Unlike the next few days when Warner's own 123 and Harris' 108 were squandered by the Australian club bowlers.

     

    The stunner of the tournament: Warner's 5 switch-hits, producing 3 x 4s and 1 x 6, producing 18 runs. An average of 3.6 runs per ball. One was off Dwayne Bravo, a medium pacer. Despite Harsha's and Ian's continued attempts to discredit this mode of play, it is legal and requires skills not possessed by 99% of international batsmen.

     

    The bowling spell of the tournament: Sunil Narine's 4-over spell of 3 for 8. This was for Trinidad and Tobago against Chennai. This was against top quality players of spin, such as Michael Hussey, Raina and Dhoni. This has also become the best ever

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  • IPL/CLT20: Their efforts were in vain

     

    When Mike Hussey scored 81, he would have
    assumed is effort would help Chennai Super Kings post a win against Mumbai
    Indians in the Champions League Twenty20. But, as Lasith 'Slinga' Malinga
    unleashed his batting skills, the win evaporated in the matter of a few swings
    of the bat. So I started wondering about such wonderful performances which
    finished on the losing side. There were quite a few.

     

     

    First, the all-round performances which
    finished on the losing side.

     

     

    MtId

    Year

    Player Name

    For

    Vs

    Runs

    O

    M

    R

    W

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    240

    2011

    Yuvraj
    Singh

    Pune
    Warriors

    DD

    66

    4

    0

    29

    4

    MOM

    83

    2009

    Yuvraj
    Singh

    Kings
    XI Punjab

    RCB

    50

    4

    0

    22

    3

    MOM

     

     

    Poor Yuvraj Singh! Twice he has scored over
    50 and captured 3 wickets, and finished on the losing side for the two teams he
    has captained in IPL. He must have felt that the whole world (okay, take it as
    the rest of the teams) were against him.

    Read More »from IPL/CLT20: Their efforts were in vain
  • Great defensive wins in ODIs

    A few months back, I looked at teams
    scoring 300+ and losing the match. Now let me look at the other side. Teams
    scoring below 140 and still finishing on the winning side. This time, I have
    given a potted summary and a one-line comment. Nothing more is needed.

     

     

    ODI
    # 593. Pakistan vs India.

    Played on 18 December 1989 at Municipal Stadium, Gujranwala.

    Pakistan
    won by 7 runs. MoM: Saeed Anwar.

    Pakistan: 87 for 9 wkt(s)
    in 16.0 overs

       Saeed Anwar         42*(32)

    India: 80 for 9 wkt(s)
    in 16.0 overs

       Imran Khan 
    4.0 0 18 3, Waqar Younis 4.0 0 21 3

    This was Tendulkar's ODI debut.

     

     

    ODI
    # 772. Australia vs West Indies.

    Played on 8 December 1992 at Sydney Cricket Ground.

    Australia
    won by 14 runs. MoM: Taylor M.A.

    Australia: 101 for 9
    wkt(s) in 30.0 overs

       Jones D.M           21 (49)

    West Indies: 87 all out in 29.3 overs

       Reiffel P.R         6.0 
    1  14  3

    Taylor got
    MoM for his 4 catches and captaincy.

     

     

    ODI
    # 284. India vs England.

    Played on 27 January 1985 at Sector 16

    Read More »from Great defensive wins in ODIs
  • T20 Bowling: A look after the Mendis special

    After 3 years, Ajanta Mendis at last got
    the ball to do the talking, albeit only in a T20 game. In one match, he
    re-wrote most of the bowling records. So I thought it is time to look at the
    T20 bowling scene. Readers would do well to remember that this refers only to T20
    Internationals and not IPL and related matches, which, in my opinion, are not
    International matches.

     

    Bowler

    Ctry

    Overs

    Mdn

    Runs

    Wkts

    Avge

    StRt

    BB

    RPO

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Shahid
    Afridi

    Pak

    161.5

    3

    1005

    53

    18.96

    18.3

    4
    for 11

    6.21

    Umar
    Gul

    Pak

    116.1

    1

    752

    47

    16.00

    14.8

    5
    for  6

    6.47

    Saeed
    Ajmal

    Pak

    108.0

    0

    693

    43

    16.12

    15.1

    4
    for 19

    6.42

    Mendis
    B.A.W

    Slk

    76.0

    2

    425

    39

    10.90

    11.7

    6
    for 16

    5.59

    Malinga
    S.L

    Slk

    102.0

    0

    743

    37

    20.08

    16.5

    3
    for 12

    7.28

    Vettori
    D.L

    Nzl

    108.1

    1

    580

    35

    16.57

    18.5

    4
    for 20

    5.36

    Johnson
    M.G

    Aus

    101.1

    1

    Read More »from T20 Bowling: A look after the Mendis special
  • Test all-round performances: A look

    At Trent Bridge, India were pulverised by two
    all-rounders, the true variety, Stuart Broad and Tim Bresnan. Broad scored 108
    runs and captured 8 wickets for 76 runs. Bresnan scored 101 runs and captured
    76 wickets for 96 runs. Rarely has been a match been dominated by two great
    all-round performances. And think of it, Bell
    would only have been third in the list of MOM candidates.

     

    So I thought this is the time to look at
    the truly great all-round performances in Test cricket. I have used a simple
    metric of converting the performances to a runs base, assigning 25 runs to a
    wicket. Of course this could be complicated a lot by considering various
    related options such as bowling quality, pitch type, wicket quality, pitch
    type, support received et al. However, let me stick to the simple formulae now.

     

    Given below is the table of all-rounders
    who have exceeded 350 "runs" in a Test. That is a lot, as you can see. It is
    the equivalent of a batsman scoring a triple-plus century or a bowler

    Read More »from Test all-round performances: A look
  • ODI Cameos: This time with the ball

    Last time I had looked at the cameos - the
    forgotten efforts in ODIs. I had looked at the short but telling batting
    efforts. This time, I have shifted my look at the bowling efforts. The key lies
    in the definition of a cameo. Just as I had indicated that a 10-ball 25 is defined
    as a cameo while a 30-ball 25 is not, we have to set the bowling parameters.
    The bar had to be moved quite a few times to get a reasonable number in. I have
    defined a bowling cameo as a bowling effort above 2 and below 5 overs in
    which the RpO value is less than one per over
    , irrespective of the wickets
    captured. The number of such efforts is now limited to 23. Not a bad filtering
    effort considering that there are over 30000 bowling stints.

     

    First let us look at the bowling cameos
    from the ‘wickets captured' angle. There is no doubt which is the most famous
    bowling cameo, although some people might consider this as not a cameo. However,
    it fulfils the conditions laid down. The Courtney Walsh bowling spell of 5

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  • Cameos in ODIs: The Forgotten Efforts

    Cricket followers remember hundreds,
    fifties, 4/5 wicket hauls in ODI matches. Very few people remember the cameos
    which often define the difference between a loss and win. In this article, I
    will look at some of the memorable cameos which have been played over the
    years.

     

    What is a cameo? I have defined, based on
    my own reading of the ODI game, a cameo to be an innings between 25 and 49. A
    quick 17 could be considered but it is not often that this would result in a
    win. On the other hand, a quick 30 will often mean a win or at least move the
    lagging innings forward. A fifty is too long an innings, even though it might
    have taken fewer than 20 balls.

     

    For this article, I have set the bar quite
    high, just so that I have very few innings to look at. I have only considered
    cameos with a scoring rate of 266.7 (RpO of 16). Even lowering this to 250
    doubles the number of innings. Thus we have only 14 innings to look at. The table
    is ordered in two ways.

     

    The first is in order of the

    Read More »from Cameos in ODIs: The Forgotten Efforts
  • ‘Recent Form’ analysis: the changes during the World Cup

    The simulation programs are the cornerstone
    of the Tournament Simulation and Daily Predictor analysis. If the simulation
    program platform stands on four legs, one of the legs is the Recent Form, which
    plays a very important part in the way the simulation results go. In an earlier
    article, I had already looked at the way the RF analysis is being done. In this
    article I will explain how specific World Cup performances are weighted
    strongly, viz., 20%, to have a profound influence on the simulation results.

     

    To explain this, I will look at four
    players: a batsman and bowler who have hit the zone during the initial phase of
    round-robin matches, and a batsman and bowler who have not done so well. This
    will explain clearly how this important measure works.

     

    First the table of AB de Villiers who has blazed away from the beginning.

     

    de
    Villiers A.B     Saf Career 113 14  4436 39.96

          W C  
    25 ( 44)

          W C 
    134 ( 98)  RF      RpI 
    10   490 49.00

          W C 
    107 (105)

          2010 
    11 ( 12) 

    Read More »from ‘Recent Form’ analysis: the changes during the World Cup

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